Diana Aviv

Diana Aviv

Diana Aviv was CEO of Feeding America, the nation’s largest domestic hunger-relief organization and third largest U.S. charity from 2015 to 2018. Previously, she served as President and CEO of Independent Sector, the national leadership network for America’s nonprofits, foundations, and corporate giving programs. She also served as executive director of the Panel on the Nonprofit Sector, convened by Independent Sector. Prior to that, Ms. Aviv served as vice president for public policy and director of the Washington Action Office for the Jewish Federations of North America. She was formerly associate executive vice chair at the Jewish Council of Public Affairs, director of programs for the National Council of Jewish Women, and director of a comprehensive program to serve battered women and their families. Ms. Aviv has served on the advisory board of the Comptroller General’s at the Government Accountability Office, the advisory board of National Center on Philanthropy and the Law, and the board of advisors at the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law. She has testified before the U.S. Congress and has been featured in media outlets. President Obama appointed her to the White House Council for Community Solutions in December 2010. A native of South Africa, Ms. Aviv is a graduate of the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg and received a master’s degree in social work at Columbia University.

Harvey P. Dale

Harvey P. Dale

Harvey P. Dale is University Professor of Philanthropy and the Law and the Director of the National Center on Philanthropy and the Law at New York University. He has been a member of the faculty of the New York University School of Law since 1977, teaching primarily in the field of nonprofit organizations for the last twenty years. Professor Dale was Founding President and a Director of The Atlantic Philanthropies and was the President and CEO of the Atlantic Foundation for approximately twenty years (until September 1, 2001). He was a member of the Trustees Investment Committee of Cornell University from 1996 to 2005. In 2007, he was named a Presidential Councillor by the Cornell University Board of Trustees. From 2001 to 2007, Professor Dale was a member of the Overseers’ Committee to Visit the Harvard Law School. He serves as a Director, Trustee, President, or Chair of various charitable organizations both in the United States and abroad and as an Advisor to the American Law Institute’s project on “Principles of the Law of Nonprofit Organizations.” He is a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Professor Dale is a graduate of Cornell University and Harvard University Law School.

Richard J. Goldstone

Richard Goldstone

Justice Richard J. Goldstone became the first scholar-in-residence at the new Sorensen Center for International Peace and Justice at City University of New York Law School in 2014. Previously, he was a visiting professor at New York University Law School, Fordham Law School, and Harvard Law School. He has also been a visiting professor at the School of Law and the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice at the University of San Diego. Prior to his move to academia, Justice Goldstone served as a justice in South Africa’s highest courts. In 1980, he began his first judgeship at the Transvaal Supreme Court, where he remained until his 1989 appointment to the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court. From 1994 to 2003, he served as a justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa. He was a member of the Independent Inquiry Committee into the United Nations Oil-for-Food Program. He served as the chairperson of the Commission of Inquiry regarding Public Violence and Intimidation (the Goldstone Commission) from 1991 to 1994. From 1994 to 1996, he served as the chief prosecutor of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. In 1999, he assumed the chairmanship of the International Independent Inquiry on Kosovo and he was appointed as the co-chairman of the International Task Force on Terrorism established by the International Bar Association. Justice Goldstone has also served as an international advisor to the International Committee of the Red Cross. He has received numerous awards, including the International Human Rights Award of the American Bar Association (1994) and the Thomas J. Dodd Prize in International Justice and Human Rights (2005), jointly with the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Louise Arbour. He is a graduate of the University of the Witwatersrand.

Karl Klare

Karl Klare

Karl Klare is the George J. and Kathleen Waters Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law at Northeastern University School of Law. Professor Klare focuses on labor and employment law, human rights, and legal theory, fields in which he has written and lectured extensively. He is considered a leading voice in the field of critical legal studies. In recent years, he has worked on numerous projects with lawyers in South Africa. He is a founder of the International Network on Transformative Employment and Labor Law and is currently active in the International Social and Economic Rights Project. In 2015, he received an honorary doctorate from the University of Pretoria in recognition of his leading work on critical legal theory and particularly for his scholarship on transformative constitutionalism, which, according to the University’s citation, “has precipitated in South Africa no less than a paradigm shift in post-apartheid legal thinking.” Professor Klare has taught as a visitor at the Universities of British Columbia, Michigan, Toronto and Cape Town, and he held a senior Fulbright chair at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy. He is a graduate of Columbia University, Yale University, and Harvard University Law School.

Anthony W. Marx

Anthony W. Marx

Anthony W. Marx has been President of The New York Public Library, the nation’s largest library system, since 2011. Under his leadership, the Library has created new early literacy and after-school programs for children and teens, dramatically increased free English language classes and citizenship support for immigrants, and improved services for scholars and students who rely on the Library’s world-renowned research collections. Under Mr. Marx, the Library has also become a national leader on bridging the digital divide through its efforts to increase access to e-books, expand computer classes and coding training, and a groundbreaking program that provides home internet access to families of low-income students. Previously, Mr. Marx served as president of Amherst College from 2003 to 2011, during which time he tripled enrollment for low-income students. Before Amherst, he was a political science professor and director of undergraduate studies at Columbia University. Mr. Marx has a BA from Yale University, an MPA from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University, and a PhD from Princeton University.

Gay J. McDougall

Gay J. McDougall

Gay J. McDougall is the Mulligan Distinguished Visiting Professor of International Law at Fordham Law School. Prior to that, she was the Father Robert F. Drinan Visiting Professor in Human Rights at the Georgetown University Law Center. Professor McDougall was the first United Nations Independent Expert On Minority Issues from 2005 to 2011 and the Convener for the United Nations Forum On Minority Issues in Geneva from 2007 to 2011. She was a Distinguished Scholar In Residence at American University’s Washington College Of Law American University, Washington, D.C., from 2006 to 2008. From 1994 to 20016, she was the Executive Director of Global Rights, working with human rights advocates from ten countries to develop strategies for justice. She was the first American to serve as an Expert Member of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination in Geneva from 1998 to 2001. Professor McDougall was a member of the Independent Electoral Commission for the first democratic elections in South Africa in 1994. From 1980 to 1994, she was Director of the Southern Africa Project for The Lawyers’ Committee For Civil Rights Under Law in Washington, D.C. She is a graduate of Bennington College, the London School of Economic and Politics, and Yale Law School.

Sheila Avrin McLean

Sheila Avrin McLean

Sheila Avrin McLean is a strategy consultant to international nonprofit and professional services organizations. She was formerly president and chief executive officer of the Boyden World Corporation. Prior to that, Ms. McLean was president of the Association of Executive Search Consultants. Her earlier positions included serving as Vice President of Education and the Arts and Executive Director, South Africa Programs, at the Institute of International Education, where she developed and ran innovative education and exchange programs in Asia, Africa, and Europe. She was founder and CEO of McLean & Company, which provided advisory services to clients such as the World Bank and the Rockefeller, Ford, Carnegie, and Aga Khan Foundations on building civil society institutions and strategic change. She also served as general counsel for the U.S. International Development Cooperation Agency. Earlier in her career, she spent a decade as Associate General Counsel and a senior corporate officer of the Ford Foundation, where she developed and ran its human rights grants program in South Africa. She began her career at Cravath, Swaine & Moore, a New York City law firm. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and has served as a director of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York. Ms. McLean’s publications include two books about international philanthropy. She is a graduate of Smith College and Yale Law School.

Andrew Sillen

Andrew Sillen

Andrew Sillen is Vice President for Institutional Advancement for Brooklyn College and Executive Director of the Brooklyn College Foundation, Inc. Previously, Dr. Sillen was Professor and Head of the Department of Archaeology and then Director of Development of the University of Cape Town (UCT) from 1985 to 2001. During that period, UCT was transformed from a predominantly white institution to a fully integrated institution meeting the needs of post-apartheid South Africa. Dr. Sillen worked closely with then Vice-Chancellor Mamphela Ramphele, the first black woman to lead a major university in South Africa, who had previously been a leader of South Africa’s Black Consciousness movement. Working with Ramphele, Dr. Sillen raised funds for undergraduate and graduate scholarships for African students and completed a capital campaign for the Harry Oppenheimer Library. From 2002 to 2005, Dr. Sillen held a variety of positions at Synergos, a non-profit founded by Peggy Rockefeller Dulany, focusing on global philanthropy. He is a graduate of Brooklyn College and holds a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.

Judith Ogden Thomson

Judith O Thomson

Judith Ogden Thomson has served as a trustee on the Boards of the Asia Society, the Archives of American Art, the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, and Boston University. She has also served as Chair and President of the Princeton Symphony Orchestra and Chair of the American Friends of the British Museum. Lady Thomson was Executive Director of the Chinese Legal Studies Program at Columbia University Law School from 1981 to 1986. From 1979 to 1981, she worked at the Chinese University of Hong Kong with senior curator James Watt on all aspects of the exhibition “Post Han Jades,” which was held at the Asia Society in 1981. From 1974 to 1978, Lady Thomson was special assistant to John Silber, President of Boston University, responsible for labor relations, visiting committees, and government and foundation relations. From 1970 to 1974, she served as staff officer in the Office of the Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, working with the Governor’s wife, Mrs. Frank Sargent, on areas concerned with welfare, female offenders, and juvenile drug abuse. She is a graduate of Radcliffe College.

Scott Wallace

Scott Wallace

For the past fifteen years, Scott Wallace has been Co-Chair of the Wallace Global Fund, a private charitable foundation founded by his grandfather, former United States Vice President Henry A. Wallace. The foundation has major program areas in environment/climate, corporate accountability, and promoting open and accountable democratic governance, particularly in the United States, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. It has played a lead role in promoting the movement to divest from fossil fuels and invest in clean energy solutions. An attorney since 1978, Mr. Wallace has specialized in criminal and constitutional law, as well as legislation and public policy. He has served as Counsel to the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, General Counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs, Director of Defender Legal Services at the National Legal Aid and Defender Association, an advisor on criminal law reform to several East African governments, and on the board of directors of numerous nonprofit organizations. He has overseen numerous criminal justice projects for the U.S. Department of Justice and has published widely on criminal justice policy. He is a graduate of Haverford College and Villanova University Law School.